Eliot, Jr.: The Rumble Murders

Eliot, Jr.: The Rumble Murders

$4.99

“Lovers of detective stories will find a rather refreshing change in this book in which the ‘homicide squad’ consisting of a much-worried suburbanite, a newspaper man, a writer of detective stories and a genuine detective, seek to solve the mystery in the pages, and prove themselves not always infallible. The mystery lies in the finding of a murdered man, whose nude body had been thrust into the rumble of an automobile lying parked under a bridge. The body was found only when the owner of the car drove it home and went to take a suitcase from the rumble. Other similar murders follow and the work of the enthusiastic four in solving the mystery is both interesting and at times humorous.” (Boston Globe, 1932)

Book Title Eliot, Jr.: The Rumble Murders
Author Henry Ware Eliot, Jr.
Type epub

“Lovers of detective stories will find a rather refreshing change in this book in which the ‘homicide squad’ consisting of a much-worried suburbanite, a newspaper man, a writer of detective stories and a genuine detective, seek to solve the mystery in the pages, and prove themselves not always infallible. The mystery lies in the finding of a murdered man, whose nude body had been thrust into the rumble of an automobile lying parked under a bridge. The body was found only when the owner of the car drove it home and went to take a suitcase from the rumble. Other similar murders follow and the work of the enthusiastic four in solving the mystery is both interesting and at times humorous.” (Boston Globe, 1932)

First published in 1932, as by Mason Deal.

"When working on his mystery story, ‘The Rumble Murders,’ Mason Deal had some doubts as to the capacity of a rumble, wondering whether or not it would actually hold two bodies with the lid closed. His subsequent belief that it would accommodate them, even if not comfortably, has since been corroborated by the discovery of the bodies of two murdered gangsters stuffed into the rumble seat of an automobile parked just in front of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine." (Kansas City Star, 1932)